Animal rescue

Chennai man creates a world of compassion with his animal rescue mission – The New Indian Express

Express press service

CHENNAI: Growing up in his grandmother’s house in Alwarpet, Antony Rubin would often watch the flying birds and prowling animals through the rusty window panes. Suffering from dyslexia, the young boy’s thoughts and hands were out of sync. “I couldn’t decode the words, people couldn’t understand me because there was so much stigma around it,” he says, adding that an IQ test taken on him in class 4 proved he had the IQ of a third-year engineering student.

When he reached class 11, Antony decided to volunteer for an NGO and test the waters working for animal welfare. It was then that he realized the purpose of his life: to help animals. “Together with the team, we were catching overloaded bullock carts and filing cases against trucks transporting animals illegally. Later, I participated in a rescue operation to save animals from illegal killing,” recalls Antony, currently an advisory member of the State Board of Wildlife.

His date with animal rescue reached a new level in 2002, after the use of wild animals, including lions, panthers, monkeys and tigers, was banned in circuses. He was informed that four lions were caged in Virudhunagar and the people behind were hiding in pockets in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. “To my surprise, the lions were kept in a rusty cage and fed vegetarian food and animal fat. Outside the caravan, life went on as usual with tea, laundry and department stores opening, and the children playing cricket casually,” Antony said, shuddering at the sight.

When his appeals to the government failed miserably, he attempted to travel to Chennai to brief the media on the incident and took them there. “Pressure from the media pushed the government to act. The four lions have been transferred to an animal rescue center in Vandalur,” Antony says with a laugh.
This was followed by the rescue of four chimpanzees and numerous horses from Marina Beach which had been kept in cruel conditions. “One of the horses died in front of us. The government then took action and seized the horses that were not in good condition,” he adds.

Apart from this, the animal lover has rescued Malabar squirrels and exotic species like peacocks and panthers bred by people to look fashionable in Chennai. Such constant intervention has drawn death threats from those who raise horses and other wild animals for subsistence. But the threats failed to dissuade Antoine from caring about the environment.

Antony was in the spotlight recently when finance minister and dog lover himself Palanivel Thiagarajan thanked him on social media for helping rescue a seven-month-old golden retriever who was reunited with the family after a 40 day search. . Ruby’s disappearance sparked an uproar when FM tweeted about it. Antony and a team of activists created a video, which was shared on social media. All food delivery people in the area were followed and focused on the boy who took the dog.

According to him, there is only one way to prevent animal cruelty and to preserve the bubble of benevolence, it is to raise awareness at school level. “The government should provide guidance to students,” he adds.

CHENNAI: Growing up in his grandmother’s house in Alwarpet, Antony Rubin would often watch the flying birds and prowling animals through the rusty window panes. Suffering from dyslexia, the young boy’s thoughts and hands were out of sync. “I couldn’t decode the words, people couldn’t understand me because there was so much stigma around it,” he says, adding that an IQ test taken on him in class 4 proved he had the IQ of a third-year engineering student. When he reached class 11, Antony decided to volunteer for an NGO and test the waters working for animal welfare. It was then that he realized the purpose of his life: to help animals. “Together with the team, we were catching overloaded bullock carts and filing cases against trucks transporting animals illegally. Later, I participated in a rescue operation to save animals from illegal killing,” recalls Antony, currently an advisory member of the State Board of Wildlife. His date with animal rescue reached a new level in 2002, after the use of wild animals, including lions, panthers, monkeys and tigers, was banned in circuses. He was informed that four lions were caged in Virudhunagar and the people behind were hiding in pockets in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. “To my surprise, the lions were kept in a rusty cage and fed vegetarian food and animal fat. Outside the caravan, life went on as usual with tea, laundry and department stores opening, and the children playing cricket casually,” Antony said, shuddering at the sight. When his appeals to the government failed miserably, he attempted to travel to Chennai to brief the media on the incident and took them there. “Pressure from the media pushed the government to act. The four lions have been transferred to an animal rescue center in Vandalur,” Antony says with a laugh. This was followed by the rescue of four chimpanzees and numerous horses from Marina Beach which had been kept in cruel conditions. “One of the horses died in front of us. The government then took action and seized the horses that were not in good condition,” he adds. Apart from this, the animal lover has rescued Malabar squirrels and exotic species like peacocks and panthers bred by people to look fashionable in Chennai. Such constant intervention has drawn death threats from those who raise horses and other wild animals for subsistence. But the threats failed to dissuade Antoine from caring about the environment. Antony was in the spotlight recently when finance minister and dog lover himself Palanivel Thiagarajan thanked him on social media for helping rescue a seven-month-old golden retriever who was reunited with the family after a 40 day search. . Ruby’s disappearance sparked an uproar when FM tweeted about it. Antony and a team of activists created a video, which was shared on social media. All food delivery people in the area were followed and focused on the boy who took the dog. According to him, there is only one way to prevent animal cruelty and to preserve the bubble of benevolence, it is to raise awareness at school level. “The government should provide guidance to students,” he adds.