Animal shelter

California Animal Shelter at full capacity

The Hitchcock Road Animal Services shelter is full and has been full most of the year. Shelter officials say the problem is that dogs and cats are arriving regularly, but they’re not being adopted at the same rate as last year. Petra Lewis, animal services supervisor at Hitchcock Road, said inflation and uncertainty in the job market are big factors. “Economic issues, a lot of people are struggling to keep their homes and to be able to afford to feed their pets and things like that and maybe adopting a pet right now isn’t ideal” , Lewis said. increased owner abandonment with many people moving or having difficulty finding rentals that allow pets. “To be honest, we got close,” said Cynthia Burnham, director of animal services for the town of Salinas. Burnam said it took a few miracles to save lives this month. Last Wednesday, Lewis said he sent a salute to rescuers across the region asking them to take animals and help them avoid euthanasia. “We’re trying hard that we don’t have to go that route, we’re exploring all other options before it’s the option,” Lewis said. The partners were able to make room on Friday, but it’s not just Salinas dealing with capacity issues. Shelters across the state are also full, making it impossible for organizations that typically team up to take animals in from other jurisdictions. Lewis and others are asking the community to not only consider adoption, but to foster the animals if possible. “There are a lot of different options that the community can help mitigate what’s going on,” Lewis said. The shelter said it could provide supplies to anyone willing to help foster. a special pop-up adoption event, open Sundays from 1-3 p.m. and all cat adoption fees are only $25.

The Hitchcock Road Animal Services shelter is full and has been for most of the year.

Shelter officials say the problem is that dogs and cats are arriving regularly, but they’re not being adopted at the same rate as last year. Petra Lewis, animal services supervisor at Hitchcock Road, said inflation and uncertainty in the job market are big factors.

“Economic issues, a lot of people are struggling to keep their homes and to be able to afford to feed their pets and things like that and maybe adopting a pet right now isn’t ideal” , Lewis said.

Lewis said he’s also seen an increase in landlord buyouts, with many people moving or having difficulty finding rentals that allow pets.

Over the past few months Hitchcock Road has had an overcapacity of cats, kittens and large dogs, and last week they came close to having to euthanize animals.

“To be honest, we got close,” said Cynthia Burnham, director of animal services for the town of Salinas.

Burnam said it took a few miracles to save lives this month.

Last Wednesday, Lewis said he sent a salute to rescuers across the region asking them to take animals and help them avoid euthanasia.

“We’re trying hard that we don’t have to go that route, we’re exploring all other options before it’s the option,” Lewis said.

The partners were able to make room on Friday, but it’s not just Salinas dealing with capacity issues. Shelters across the state are also full, making it impossible for organizations that typically team up to take animals in from other jurisdictions.

Lewis and others are asking the community to not only consider adoption, but to foster the animals if possible.

“There are a lot of different options that the community can help mitigate what’s going on,” Lewis said.

The shelter said it could provide supplies to anyone willing to help with the foster family.

On Sunday, Hitchcock Road Animal Services will be hosting a special pop-up adoption event, open Sunday from 1-3 p.m. and all cat adoption fees are just $25.